A cancer diagnosis raises a wide range of challenges and concerns. Fortunately, there are local and national resources to assist children and teenagers with many of the issues that come up. This fact sheet describes several kinds of services available to children and teenagers with cancer and their loved ones, and how to find the help you need.

Support Services

CancerCare for Kids
800-813-4673
Provides counseling in NYC, NJ and CT. Offers online teen support groups moderated by oncology social workers. Telephone support is available for parents nationwide.

American Childhood Cancer Organization
855-858-2226
Offers free books and publications for families of children with cancer. Online peer support for parents and caregivers.

Cancer Support Community
888-793-9355
Centers in many cities that provide support services for children affected by cancer.

Group Loop
Program of the Cancer Support Community. Offers professionally monitored discussion boards and online support groups for teens with cancer or affected by a loved one’s cancer diagnosis.

Kids Konnected
Support services and care packages for children who have a parent with cancer or are bereaved.

Look Good…Feel Better
800-395-5665
Program that helps teens deal with appearance, health, and social side effects of cancer treatment. Offered in select hospitals and online.

My Cancer Circle
Free, private support community for caregivers. Online tool to organize the community of people who want to help.

SuperSibs
Provides support to siblings of children with cancer.

Camps

Camp Kesem
260-225-3736
One-week sleepaway camp for children who have a parent who has (or has had) cancer. Sixty-two chapters throughout the United States.

Camp Quality USA
330-671-0167
Free weeklong camp for children with cancer. Locations in 12 states.

KiDS NEED MoRE
631-608-3135
Free weeklong sleepaway camp for kids with cancer and their siblings. Open to those in tri-state area.

Sunrise Day Camp
516-766-4341
Free day camp for children with cancer and their siblings (ages 3-16). Sunrise Day Camp at Pearl River serves Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester County, southern Connecticut and northern New Jersey.

Lodging

American Cancer Society Hope Lodge
800-227-2345
Provides free lodging in various cities for a patient & caregiver traveling for treatment.

Ronald McDonald House
Provides free or low-cost lodging for families who must travel for their child’s medical treatment.

Wigs

Children with Hair Loss
734-379-4400
Provides human hair replacements to children at no cost.

Wigs for Kids
440-333-4433
Creates free hair replacement systems for children experiencing hair loss due to cancer treatment.

Books for Children with Cancer

Kathy’s Hats: A Story of Hope by Trudy B. Krishner and Nadine Bernard Westcott

Henry and the White Wolf
by Tim Karu

H is for Hair Fairy: An Alphabet of Encouragement and Insight for Kids (and Kids at Heart!) With Cancer
by Kim Martin

Books for Children with A Loved One with Cancer

Butterfly Kisses and Wishes on Wings
by Ellen McVicker
(Available in Spanish)

The Paper Chain
by Blake, Blanchard & Parkinson

In Mommy’s Garden
by Neyal J. Ammary

Kemo Shark
by Kidscope, Inc.

Life Isn’t Always a Day at the Beach
by Pam Ganz and Tobi Scofield

When Someone Has a Very Serious Illness: Children Can Learn to Cope with Loss and Change
by Marge Heegaard

My Daddy Sits Upon a Star
by Claire Grainger-Valvano, LCSW

e-Book for Teens with Cancer

CanTeen: A Young Person’s Guide to Dealing with Cancer

Books for Teens with Loved a One with Cancer

What About Me?: A Booklet for Teenage Children of Cancer Patients
by Linda Leopold Strauss
To order, call 513-731-3346

Will I Get Breast Cancer?: Questions and Answers for Teenage Girls
by Carole Vogel

Both Sides Now
by Ruth Pennebaker

When Your Parent Has Cancer: A Guide for Teens
National Cancer Institute

Books for Parents/Caregivers

How to Help Children Through a Parent’s Serious Illness
by Kathleen McCue

Can I Still Kiss You? Answering Your Children’s Questions about Cancer
by Neil Russell

Cancer In the Family: Helping Children Cope with a Parent’s Illness
by Sue P. Heiney, Joan F. Hermann and Katherine V. Fincannon

Raising an Emotionally Healthy Child: When a Parent is Sick
by Paula K. Rauch

When a Parent Has Cancer: A Guide to Caring for Your Children
by Dr. Wendy Schessel Harpham

The information provided here is purely informational and does not imply endorsement from CancerCare nor does it guarantee eligibility for assistance.

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This fact sheet has been made possible by Bristol-Myers Squibb; and supported by a grant from Genentech.

Last updated January 01, 2016

The information presented in this publication is provided for your general information only. It is not intended as medical advice and should not be relied upon as a substitute for consultations with qualified health professionals who are aware of your specific situation. We encourage you to take information and questions back to your individual health care provider as a way of creating a dialogue and partnership about your cancer and your treatment.

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