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Counseling

Counseling

Oncology social workers help you cope with the emotional and practical challenges of uterine cancer. Contact us at 800‑813‑HOPE (4673) or info@cancercare.org.
Learn more about counseling.

Financial assistance

Financial Assistance

Find resources and support to manage your financial concerns. Limited assistance from CancerCare® is available to eligible families for cancer-related costs.

Support groups

Support Groups

Connect with others in our free support groups led by oncology social workers.

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Community programs

Community Programs

If you live in New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut, learn about and view the full calendar of our free community programs.

Find Information

Connect workshops

Connect Education Workshops

Listen in by telephone or online as leading experts in oncology provide up-to-date information about cancer-related issues in one-hour workshops. Podcasts are also available.

We currently do not offer a Uterine Cancer specific workshop. You may be interested in these general-interest workshops:

Upcoming Workshops

General Topics

Podcasts

General Topics
Ask cancercare

Ask CancerCare

Every month, featured experts answer your questions about coping with cancer. View all questions and answers.

Uterine Cancer
  • Q.

    I've been diagnosed with uterine cancer and my OB-GYN did not refer me to anyone. How can I find a specialist?

    A.

    I’d recommend locating a highly skilled gynecologic oncologist. This is a doctor who specializes in the surgical care and medical treatment of women with cancer of the reproductive organs. Keep in mind that you want to choose a doctor who specializes in treating uterine cancer based on his or her credentials, as well as one with whom you feel comfortable and whose style you like.

  • Q.

    I've been diagnosed with endometrial cancer and will have a hysterectomy. I'm worried about the physical and emotional toll it might take. Is there any way I can prepare myself?

    A.

    Taking time to prepare yourself before your treatment can help reduce anxiety. One of the ways in which planning can be beneficial is by talking with your doctor about what to expect before and after a hysterectomy, both physically and emotionally. Our fact sheet, “Doctor Can We Talk? Tips for Communicating With Your Health Care Team, might be helpful as it provides tips on how to make the most out of your visit.

    It is equally important to acknowledge you may have different feelings before and after your surgery. In order to explore those feelings, you may want to consider options for building in emotional support. Many women find comfort in support groups by sharing their feelings and learning how others cope with challenges and common fears. Individual counseling might also be helpful. You can learn more about CancerCare support groups or speak with an oncology social worker.

    You may also contact HysterSisters offers information, support, and resources for hysterectomy-related needs.

    Additionally, some people find various activities help ease their anxiety such as journaling, meditating, exercise, and exploring nature. If there are activities in your life that bring you a sense of calm, it is particularly important during this time to seek out and engage in those activities.

  • Stories

    Stories of Help and Hope

    Read inspiring personal accounts from people affected by cancer and the ways they've found to cope.

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