Surgery can be a treatment option to stop cancer from spreading to other parts of the body. Some surgeries, like a mastectomy, involve removing part of the body that is affected by cancer. Prostheses are man-made substitutes that can replace a part of the body and can help individuals feel and look more comfortable.

CancerCare’s Breast Prosthesis Clinic

CancerCare recognizes that appearance-related effects of cancer treatment can be difficult for many women. Our Prosthesis Clinic aims to empower women diagnosed with cancer to look and feel their best during treatment and beyond; to cope with dignity and confidence.

CancerCare’s Prosthesis Clinic is an opportunity for women with breast cancer who have had a mastectomy to receive mastectomy supplies free of charge. During an individual 30-minute fitting, women can try on mastectomy bras and breast prostheses with assistance from a trained fitter. An oncology social worker is also present to provide support. We’re able to provide two mastectomy bras and a breast prosthesis free of charge. It is required that clients wait at least six weeks post-surgery to allow for proper healing.

This clinic is held at CancerCare’s New York office and registration is required. To register and for more information please contact 800‑813‑HOPE (4673) or email info@cancercare.org. Our oncology social workers can refer patients and caregivers living outside of New York City to prosthesis resources in their community.

National Prostheses Resources

Cancer Resource Network’s “All4One Breast Form Fund”
www.cancer1source.org

The All4One Breast Form Fund, administered by Cancer Resource Network, may pay up to $300 towards a breast prosthesis. Applications are available exclusively from the website, and if approved you must be fit by a certified mastectomy prosthesis fitter at an approved retail store.

Cancer Survivors’ Fund
www.cancersurvivorsfund.org

Cancer Survivors’ Fund’s goal is to reach every young cancer survivor who is actively seeking a scholarship and/or financial assistance to obtain prosthetics. Visit their website to learn about their Young Cancer Survivor Scholarships. Also, they have a Prosthetic Limb Assistance Program.

First Hand Foundation
www.firsthandfoundation.org
816‑201‑1569

First Hand Foundation provides funding for children with health-related needs when insurance and other financial resources have been exhausted. Can assist with costs such as medicine, therapy, prostheses, wheelchairs, assistive technology equipment, care devices, hearing aids, lodging (only if charitable housing is unavailable), gas ($0.33 per mile), parking and transportation related to a child’s care and vehicle modifications: lifts, ramps and transfer boards.

Friends of Man
www.friendsofman.org

Friends of Man accept applications only from referring professionals on behalf of people in need. If the application is approved, Friends of Man pays a vendor for the needed items or services.

In Colorado, Friends of Man can help with mobility equipment: (prostheses, wheelchairs, van lifts, and modifications, ramps, home modifications), medical equipment and procedures, hearing aids, dentures, eyeglasses and basic needs (clothing for children, food, short-term daycare, prescriptions, COBRA/health insurance).

Outside of Colorado, Friends of Man assists with many needs such as: prostheses, wheelchairs, medical equipment and mobility equipment.

Sister’s Network
866-781-1808
www.sistersnetworkinc.org

Sister’s Network is a national African-American Breast Cancer Survivorship organization whose Breast Cancer Assistance Program may provide funds for copays, medical-related lodging, office visits, and prostheses. An application can be downloaded from their website.

Triple Step Toward the Cure
www.triplesteptowardthecure.org

Triple Step Toward the Cure seeks to promote awareness and education for the diagnosis, treatment, and cure of triple negative breast cancer and to provide support, both emotional and financial, to affected individuals and their families. They offer assistance with: meal delivery, emergency funds for rent, groceries, and utilities, transportation related to treatment, housekeeping services, childcare, selected co-pay assistance, prosthetics and wigs.

Edited by Stacy Lewis, LMSW, ACHP-SW

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Last updated June 20, 2016

The information presented in this publication is provided for your general information only. It is not intended as medical advice and should not be relied upon as a substitute for consultations with qualified health professionals who are aware of your specific situation. We encourage you to take information and questions back to your individual health care provider as a way of creating a dialogue and partnership about your cancer and your treatment.

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