Q. My best friend's husband has just started chemo for lung cancer but refuses to quit smoking. This is driving a huge wedge between the two of them. Does smoking impact the effectiveness of the chemo?

A.

This is a common question that comes up for people diagnosed with and in treatment for lung cancer. Some lung cancer patients continue to use tobacco products either because the chemical addiction to nicotine is so strong that they are unable to quit, or they have found that smoking provides them with a soothing or calming effect in stressful situations.

A study featured at the 2006 Annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) reported that nicotine stopped chemotherapy drugs such as gemcitabine, cisplatin and taxol—all of which figure prominently in first-line treatment of lung cancer—from killing cancer cells and significantly reduced the effectiveness of the treatment, according to the researchers.

In contrast, another 2006 research study, conducted by the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, focused on the overall survival of late-stage, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who quit smoking or continued to smoke during treatment. The study, which followed the survival experiences of 1,370 NSCLC patients from 1993 through 2002, found no significant difference in overall survival between these two groups of patients. Among those patients who did survive, however, and who had quit smoking at the onset of their treatment, the risk of developing a second lung cancer was significantly lower.

Your shared that your friend’s husband’s smoking is affecting their relationship. CancerCare’s oncology social workers often work with couples in situations like this and are able to help them develop new communications skills which can reduce stress and improve relationships. Please urge your friend to call us at 1-800-813-HOPE (4673).

For more information and resources about smoking cessation, read the American Cancer Society’s Guide to Quitting Smoking or visit Smokefree.gov.